P707 IPMO-P® International PMO Practitioner

Since project management offices began to appear in organizations, academic researchers, project management practitioners and their organizations have been asking how best structure project management offices (PMOs), what roles, functions and leadership styles should they adopt to provide the maximum value.

High-performing Project Management Offices (PMOs) are more than three times as likely as their low-performing peers to reach their full potential in contributing business value to their organizations. In 2012, a survey from PMI (2013) showed that PMOs completed an average of US$100 million worth of projects. Additionally, they delivered around US$71 million in value by way of revenue increases and/or cost reductions. The problem is that less than 33% of PMOs reach the full potential which indicates a limited understanding in how PMOs should be defined not only at the project, program and portfolio levels but also what they do, how they do it, and the configuration that optimally supports the organizational needs of today, and tomorrow.

This course brings together the latest in academic research and best practices across the project, program and portfolio (strategic) areas into a PMO framework that will allow the attendee to understand the building blocks of project, program and portfolio management, success factors, success criteria, PMOs types, assessment of the current PMO setups in terms of SWOT and then a roadmap to strategically design and implement an integrated approach to ensure PMO alignment with organizational needs.

You will be able to design and establish PMOs from a services and capabilities perspective within the context of the organization, the project types they support, PMO functions including their ability to act as catalysts to knowledge sharing units that seed and support innovation groups whilst understanding the risks associated with long-term PMO performance. In doing so, will you will have opportunity to find out why some PMOs might perform below expectations as well as learn how to improve individual and collective PMO performance in an organization to achieve maximum business value.

This course is also designed to be hands-on, encompasses the day-to-day operational aspects of PMOs by detailing the challenges and best practices to improve communication and optimize resource utilization. You will learn how to prioritize projects, and monitor progress and budgets on a continual basis. You will take away key documents from the course that can be used immediately at your workplace to carryout PMO strategic and operational reviews, as well as the day-to-day activities.

Pre-Requisites

  • 1 year plus experience in project and/or program management
  • 2 years plus as a PMO member or higher i.e., manager/director
  • Ideally a formal PM certification such as PMP, or Prince2® or IPMA1 (Levels C or higher i.e. B or A)

Learning Outcome

  • Understand the value of high performing PMOs
  • Describe the different roles of PMOs in a single and networked context and across different levels of the organization
  • Understand the similarities and differences of organizational project management maturity versus PMO maturity
  • Hands-on experience on applying the PMO lifecycle using the detailed case study to walk through a real PMO enterprise example
  • Experience establishing mandate for PMOs implementations
  • Identify the steps required to implement PMOs ranging from a single project based PMO, to enterprise wide PMOs
  • Learn new tools and techniques never used before in the PMO arena

Who Should Attend

  • PMO Directors/PMO Managers
  • Project/program management professionals Consultants (involved in projects and/or organizational change)
  • Project/program/portfolio managers with expertise in PMOs
  • Experienced PMO Core team

Approach

  • Lecture
  • Team exercises
  • Group discussions on pertinent topics
  • Detailed five day case study
  • Presentations and role play
  • Personal coaching (if time allows)
  • Exam – 1 hour 30 minutes with 75 multiple choice questions
  • Discussing the exam answers

Date and Duration

  • 15-19 October, 2017
  • Classroom training: 5 Days

PDUs

  • 35 PMI PDU’s

 Venue

Bonnington Jumeirah Lakes Towers, Dubai, UAE

Course Fee

US$ 3,990

Certification and Requirements

The Association of International Project Management Officers (AIPMO©) is a professional international association with a researcher community representing International Project Management Offices including Project, Program and Portfolio managers involved or responsible for the determination of PMO needs, business justification, design, establishment, running including the retirement of high performing Project Management Offices.

AIPMO© exclusively facilitates and delivers global PMO certification standards and is the issuer for the IPMO-Foundation certification (IPMO-F®), the IPMO-Practitioner certification (IPMO-P), and the IPMO-Expert level certification (IPMO-E). The three levels of certifications indicate the levels of competencies for International Project Management Officers which are based on AIPMO’s IPMO Body of Knowledge© including its integrated IPMO Lifecycle Framework.

Certified IPMO-P® professionals have demonstrated, through a combination of formal training and competency assessment, that they have an in-depth understanding of PMO principles and practices including the design, implementation and operation of enterprise wide-PMOs.

  • Delegates will need to take an exam and submit a completed case study before the last in-class session for marking
  • Delegates will need to pass both the examination and the case study criteria to receive certification

Course Facilitator

Dr. Robert Joslin IPMO-E®, PfMP, PgMP, IEEE, CEng is a project/program/portfolio management consultant, instructor and academic researcher. He has 20 plus years in designing, initiating project and program management delivery of large scale business transformation, reengineering, infrastructure, strategy development initiatives including winning prizes for ideas and product innovation.

Previously, he has been a consultant in wide-range of industries including telecom, banking, insurance, manufacturing and direct marketing whilst working for McKinsey & Co, Logica and his own consulting company.

Robert has published many book chapters and research papers in the field of project, program and portfolio management and presents his research at conferences such as PMI research and the European management conference (EURAM). He won best paper award for EURAM – PMI and IPMA conference in 2015. Robert is the founder and organizer of the annual PMI Swiss program management conferences which is the biggest PMI event in Switzerland where researchers and senior practitioners present their latest findings. He has also recently been appointed on PMI’s core committee for the new Project Portfolio Standard V4 due in 2017 and a reviewer of the upcoming project and program standards.

In addition, Robert is a peer reviewer for research papers submitted to PMI’s Project Management Journal and the International Journal of Project Management which are the top two research journals for projects, programs and portfolios.

As a trainer/coach Robert has trained many PMO, project and program managers in Europe, USA and the Middle East including using in his own developed PMO information structuring methodology aligned and complementing the PMI standards. Robert in the process of authoring a book on Portfolio, Program and Project management Success Factors based on ten years of academic research. Robert is the co-founder of the Association of International PMOs and the co-author of the AIPMO body of knowledge©.

Course Outline

MODULE 1: BUILDING THE CONTEXT AND NEED FOR PMO’S

  • How Organizational Vision, Mission and Operational Objectives are linked to the realization of organization strategy through portfolios comprising of projects and programs
  • How project, program, product and portfolio life cycles are related
  • Functional, matrix and projectized organizations
  • Challenges and risks associated with projects, programs and portfolios
  • Project Methodologies – pros, cons and risks associated with knowledge based, procedural and competency based methodologies
  • Complexity and the need for principle based methodologies
  • Understanding the difference between project management success and project success
  • Success factors and success criteria – what they are and how to select the right ones to achieve success
  • Type 1 and Type 2 errors – impact on project, program and portfolio success
  • Stakeholders and their impact on PMO performance and project success
  • ‘Constantly changing factors’ and the impact on projects, programs and portfolios
  • The historical requirement for PMOs
  • History and evolution of PMOs (tactical vs strategic)
  • Mapping project, program and portfolio success factors to the PMO function
  • Why organizations are now giving senior management attention to fully understanding the potential of PMOs in both single and in a multi-PMO construct.

MODULE 2: PMO LIFECYCLE TO BUILD AND RUN PMO’S

Introduction to the PMO Lifecycle Framework

  • Definition of capability, service and how they are applied within the PMO context

Business Strategy and Environmental Enterprise Factors

  • Definitions and what they are
  • Describe how they influence PMO needs, design and running of PMOs
  • Techniques to categorize impacts and approaches to leverage opportunities and reduce threats

Governance

  • The concept of governance
  • PMO governance responsibilities

Adaptive Alignment

  • Definition
  • What is adaptive alignment
  • Why is it important
  • Process of adaptive alignment

MODULE 3: ASSESSING THE NEED, BUILDING AND/OR EXTENDING PMO’S

Business Needs

  • Process to determine direct and indirect business needs

Identification/Evaluate/Strategize

  • Identification of existing PMOs and potential PMO need
  • Evaluate existing and new PMO opportunities within organizational context
  • Strategize – How (PMOs will best fit and support organizational needs)

Business Justification

  • Building PMO Business Case(s)
  • Initiative specific PMO
  • Organizational PMO
  • Tools and Techniques

Design, Pilot and Implement

  • Design
  • Pilot
  • Implement
  • Defining metrics and tools
  • Planning for Quality (QA and QC)
  • Leveraging Organization Process Assets

MODULE 4: RUN, MONITOR AND CONTROL ONE (OR MORE) PMO’S

Run PMO’s

  • PMO Operations handbook
  • PMO Services and Capabilities handbook
  • Identifying and supporting troubled projects

Monitor, Adjust (Change) & Control

  • Proactive and Reactive aspects of PMOs
  • Assessing PMO maturity levels
  • Managing and Controlling Quality

MODULE 5: TRANSFORM/RETIRE PMO’S

  • Reason why PMOs are retired
  • Detailed process to close a PMO
  • Tools to support the closing processes
  • Facilitation of PMO Lessons Learned Discussions
  • Guidelines for transforming a PMO into another entity

MODULE 6: CAPABILITIES TO BUILD AND RUN A PMO

  • Strategy
  • Business
  • Project/Program Management/Portfolio related
  • Service/Capability Management

MODULE 7: EPONYMOUS LAWS, THEORIES AND LATEST PROJECT MANAGEMENT & PMO RESEARCH

  • Definitions of a eponymous law, theory and phenomenon
  • Examples of eponymous laws that apply to project management
  • Use of theories in academic research
  • Single and Double loop learning systems
  • Applying system dynamics to model processes, contracts etc. to understand throughput and constraints before they happen
  • PMO hot research topics and top 10 findings
  • Managing management expectations on PMOs and how to stay relevant
  • Reasons why PMOs average life is only 2 years and how to adapt to increase the PMO’s value proposition
  • What comes after PMO certification in your career development

5 DAY CASE STUDY

The case study has been designed to allow the participants to enact out several roles including consultant, advisor, Head of PMO, senior management and performance manager throughout the PMO lifecycle within an industry.

The participants will work in teams during to the week and follow a structure that models the types of decisions and issue associated with PMOs including the optimal placement and configuration from an enterprise perspective. As part of the case study the teams will produce key document deliverables (artifacts) and manage the types of internal and external influences on a PMO.

There will be role play and coaching throughout the week. The case study builds on the knowledge gained throughout the course and embeds the knowledge through the 30 plus exercises.

P905 Project Management Professional (PMP)® Certification Exam Preparation

The Project Management Institute’s Project Management Professional (PMP)® certification is accepted worldwide as proof of project management experience and competency. Having a (PMP)® certification proves that the candidate has an advanced level of experience and project management knowledge, as well as capability to study for and pass a rigorous examination. This seminar will teach the student the logistics of the examination, how to apply for it, how to prepare for it and how to pass the exam. The seminar will provide the basic knowledge required, and cover all the steps needed to pass the exam and attain the PMP® certification. The course is designed for professionals seeking to refresh their knowledge on A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)  before taking the PMP® exam, as well as for those who are interested in understanding the science of Project Management and how it applies to their business.

Who Should Attend

This course is suitable for Executives and mid career employees with at least 3 years (4,500) hours of project management experience, Project Management Team Members, Project Coordinators, Project Administrators, Project Expediters, Assistant Project Managers and Junior Project Managers. However, Senior Project Managers are often interested in attending the course and applying for the examination to prove being educated and aware of the state-of- the-art Project Management Knowledge and Terminology.

Course Outline

The course follows the framework of A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) Fifth Edition. Each topic is introduced and discussed, with emphasis on the Inputs-Processes-Tools and Techniques-and Outputs structure outlined in  A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)  Fifth Edition.

Introduction, Organizational Influences and Project Life Cycle, Project Management Processes Integration Management

  • Get to know classmates (company, industry, background)
  • PMI® and PMP® certification process
  • Project management context, life cycles, Process Groups and Knowledge Areas
  • Balancing the advanced triple constraints of a project; Project Stakeholders, Project Manager skills
  • Project Management in different Types of Organizations
  • Inputs-processes-outputs of Integration Management
  • Develop Project Charter, Develop Project Management Plan, Direct and Manage Project Work, Monitor and Control Project Work, Perform Integrated Change Control, Close Project or Phase
  • Questions & answers

Project Scope Management; Project Time Management

  • Plan Scope Management, Collect Requirements, Define Scope, Create WBS, Validate Scope and Control Scope
  • Plan Schedule Management, Define- and Sequence Activities, Estimate Activity Resources and Duration, Develop and control Schedule.
  • Critical Path Method (CPM) using a hands on Network Diagram Exercise
  • Schedule Compression
  • Questions & answers

Cost Management, Quality Management, Human Resource Management

  • Plan Cost management; Estimate Costs, Determine Budget
  • Earned Value Management Case Study and Control Costs
  • Plan Quality, Perform Quality Assurance and Control Quality
  • Plan Human Resource Management, Acquire-, Develop- and Manage Project Team.
  • Management Styles, HR Recognized Theories
  • Questions & answers

Communication Management, Risk Management, Procurement Management, Stakeholder Management

  • Plan-, Manage- and Control Communications
  • Plan Risk management, Identify Risks, Perform Qualitative and Quantitative Risk analysis, Plan Risk Responses and Control Risks
  • Plan Procurement Management, Conduct-, Control and Close Procurements.
  • Contract Types
  • Identify Stakeholders, Plan Stakeholder Management, Manage and Control Stakeholder Engagement
  • Questions & answers

Professional Responsibility

  • Legal, ethical, and professional behavior
  • Code of conduct, cultural issues of international projects
  • The PMP® Certification process
  • Test-taking techniques
  • Mock Examination

15.7 million new project management roles will be added globally across seven project-intensive industries by 2020 Value-of-PM-Talent-Gap

PMBOK, PMI and PMP are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

P896 Effective Project Controls for Engineering & Construction Projects

Today, and more than ever, project owners, consultants and contractors are required to adopt best practices when it comes to managing their engineering and construction projects. No organization can afford to have their projects going out of control. Projects that finish late and over budget are results from failure to manage and control those projects.

In an engineering and construction project, the organization that will have the highest exposure to the damages and loses associated with project delays and budget overrun, is the organization with the weakest project controls. Why? Because this organization will be the least capable of the project organizations to support their claims for compensation or to defend themselves against claims raised against them.

So can your organization afford to be the weakest link in the project delivery process? Can your organization afford to be blamed for project delays? Can your organization afford to be blamed for project budget overrun?

Learning Outcome

  • How to have an Integrated Project Control System (PCS)
  • What are the objectives of the PCS modules in achieving the integrated PCS
  • How today’s available software applications can support PCS
  • How to implement each PCS module successfully
  • How to ensure that the PCS is conveying single version of the truth on project’s status

Who Should Attend

This course targets Program Managers, Project Managers, Design Managers, Construction Managers, Technical Managers, Project Control Managers and Engineers, Engineers and Planners, Information Commercial Managers, Cost Engineers, Quantity Surveyors, Document Administrators and others.

In What Industries

Government, Real Estate Development, Aerospace, Defense, Engineering and Construction, Manufacturing and Indus- trial, Oil and Gas, Petrochemical, Power and Water Utility Plants, Education and Training, Retail, Financial Services, Information Technology, Telecommunication, Automotive, Media Production, E-Business Enablers, Marketing and Sales, Pharmaceuticals, Environmental Management, Hospitality Management, Shipbuilding and Repair Yards.

Course Outline

Introduction

  • Project and Program Related Definitions
  • Project Success and Delivery Pains
  • Project Life Cycle Stages and Stage Gates
  • Enterprise Project Control System (PCS) Modules

Planning & Scheduling

  • Develop the project WBS
  • Develop master and detailed level schedule to reflect how the project scope will be delivered
  • Identify key milestone dates
  • Identify resources requirement to deliver the project scope
  • Identify the impact of constraints on the project milestone dates
  • Capture the actual project progress events
  • Maintain project history by keeping baseline revisions
  • Assess the impact of delays and establish accountability

Cost Management

  • Develop the project cost estimate
  • Develop the project budget
  • Manage budget revisions
  • Project Buyout (Tender and Award)
  • Pre-Qualification of Contractors and Suppliers
  • Managing Bid
  • Manage Contracts and Purchase Orders (PO)
  • Change Orders
  • Periodical Progress Invoices
  • Snag List
  • Project Closeout
  • Earned Value definitions and metrics

Risk Management

  • Defining and Identifying Project Risks
  • Risk Likelihood, Impact and Score
  • Developing the Risk Register
  • Risk Response Actions
  • Activity Risk Scenarios
  • Monte Carlo Simulation
  • Issue Management

Project Communications and Documents

  • Managing Project Records
  • Project Stakeholders and Type of Communication
  • Stakeholders Directory
  • Request For Information
  • Meeting Minutes
  • Notices
  • Letters
  • Daily Reports
  • Submittals and Transmittals
  • Other type of project records

Managing, Communicating and Sharing Projects Information Using BI Dashboards

VAL101 Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) Principles and Practices

This course offers participants the opportunity to learn how to use the PDRI methodology in front end planning to achieve substantially improved performance in capital project cost, schedule and delivery against operational asset business objectives.

The course provides lessons learned on how to achieve increased team alignment, identify gaps and risks, and objectively measure progress in scope definition.  Each of the project templates (industrial, infrastructure and buildings) is introduced, along with guidelines on how to select the best template for each project. Recommended facilitation techniques are explained, as well as roles, responsibilities and logistics of conducting a PDRI session.

Who Should Attend

This course targets project stakeholders involved in front end planning. Past attendees include Program Managers, Project Managers, Design Managers, Designers, Construction Managers, Technical Managers, Project Estimators and Schedulers Business Unit leaders, Site Supervisors, Project Finance personnel, Operations leaders, Contract Administrators, Maintenance Managers, Risk specialists, Procurement professionals, Materials Supervisors, Quality specialists, Legal, Project Controls analysts , Engineers and Planners, Information Commercial Managers, Cost Engineers, Quantity Surveyors, Health & Safety professionals and others.

In What Industries

Government, Engineering and Construction, Manufacturing and Industrial, Oil, Gas and Petrochemical, Power, Water Utility Plants, Pharmaceuticals, Environmental Management, Shipbuilding and Repair Yards, Real Estate Development, Defense and Aerospace.

Course Outline

Introduction

  • Overview of course objectives and agenda
  • Interactive exercise – participants will complete a poll on the level of maturity of scope definition in their organization.
  • Introduction to the Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) and its role in improving project performance

PDRI Methodology

  • Introduction to front end planning (FEP)
  • Structure of PDRI in Carve
  • Application during front end planning (FEL) stages
  • The assessment process
  • Scoring system
  • Measuring progress of scope definition

Project Templates

  • Introduction to available templates
  • Walkthrough of the
    • Industrial template
    • Building template
    • Infrastructure template
  • Using PDRI in greenfield and brownfield projects
  • Using PDRI for small, large and mega-projects
  • Interactive exercise – participants will use interactive polling to vote on the best project template to use for a PDRI assessment in multiple project examples.

Preparing for a PDRI Session

  • Who should attend?
  • Specific benefits for
    • Business unit leaders
    • Cost estimators
    • Scheduler/planners
    • Risk managers
    • Engineering contractors and consultants
    • Shutdown/turnaround managers
    • Procurement managers
  • Session roles, responsibilities and logistics
  • Characteristics of great PDRI facilitators
  • Background materials to provide a facilitator preparing for a PDRI session
  • Interactive exercise – using a case study, participants will apply the fundamentals of risk management to identify risks and prepare for a PDRI session.

Conducting the PDRI Session using Carve

  • Recommended techniques to ensure consistency in the element review process
  • Using the low definition element list
  • Creating effective action items
  • Importance of the executive summary
  • Comparison of total score to industry and internal benchmarks
  • Putting the final PDRI report to use
  • Importance of a debrief session
  • Sharing PDRI results with senior stakeholders
  • Interactive exercise – using a case study, the group will participate in a Mock PDRI session. Each participant will be assigned a role from the project team and provided with behavior hints. The instructor will facilitate the Mock PDRI session using Carve. The group will assess a range of elements and practice behaviors that encourage open and honest communication, identifying gaps, capturing relevant comments, and assigning a definition level.

Lessons Learned on Increasing Alignment

  • Using an early reviews to increase project team alignment and understanding business objectives
  • Using PDRI to increase alignment between owners and contractors
  • Leveraging PDRI to communicate known risks when a project handover occurs after FEL-3

Summary

  • Revisit the group’s poll results on organizational maturity of scope definition
  • Review how PDRI can be applied to improve scope definition and project performance
  • Discuss important “take-aways”
  • Conduct course evaluation

Course Instructor

Sandra MacGillivray, MBA, PMP is the Managing Director for Valency Inc., a provider of project readiness solutions that reduce risk for organizations that manage a large portfolio of capital projects. She is a Certified PDRI Facilitator, Registered Education Provider (REP) with the Construction Industry Institute (CII), and a Project Management Professional (PMP) with over 15 years of project management experience. Sandra is a past research team member with the Construction Industry Institute on front end planning, risk management and portfolio management. She holds a Bachelor of Science from the University of Waterloo and a Master in Business Administration from Wilfred Laurier University.

Certificate

A certificate of completion will be issued to those who attend and complete the course. The course is conducted by Valency, a Registered Education Provider for the Construction Industry Institute (CII). Those who complete the course will earn 8 Professional Development Hour (PDH) credits.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course participants will be able to:

  • Explain the PDRI methodology and benefits to their project organization
  • Recommend when a PDRI session should be conducted in front end planning
  • Select the most appropriate project template to use for a project
  • Understand the roles, responsibilities and logistics for a PDRI session
  • Select project professionals that are best suited as PDRI facilitators
  • Understand how to fully utilize findings from a PDRI session to improve project performance

Set expectations with senior stakeholders of how PDRI will improve communication of risk

VAL201 Best practices in implementing Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) using Carve

This course provides participants with a roadmap for implementation of Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) in their project organization. Lessons learned and case studies are used to introduce PDRI implementation planning considerations. Topics covered include:

  • Conducting needs analysis and building your business case for PDRI
  • Preparing for change and recognizing common organizational impacts
  • Initiating a successful limited-use pilot of PDRI
  • Planning for growth of your PDRI implementation, including
    • Process integration with stage gate deliverables, cost, schedule and risk practices
    • Identifying fit-for-purpose changes to PDRI elements with the rollout to new groups or divisions
    • Developing your education plan
    • Maintaining consistency in PDRI practices using Carve
    • Measuring performance impact of PDRI and monitoring by portfolio/group/division in Carve
    • Incorporating PDRI into your lessons learned program

A prerequisite for this course is either our VAL-101 PDRI Principles & Practices course, or a thorough understanding of the Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI).

Who should attend

This course targets those responsible for implementing PDRI for their organization. Past attendees include: Business unit leaders, Program Managers, Portfolio Managers, Project Managers, Site Supervisors and Foremen, Materials Supervisors, Contracts Managers, Risk Managers, Project Finance, Project Estimators and Schedulers, Quality specialists, Continuous Improvement and Center of Excellence professionals

In What Industries

Government, Engineering and Construction, Manufacturing and Industrial, Oil, Gas and Petrochemical, Power, Water Utility Plants, Pharmaceuticals, Environmental Management, Shipbuilding and Repair Yards, Real Estate Development, Defense and Aerospace.

Course Outline

Introduction

  • Overview of course objectives and agenda
  • Introduction to the Implementation planning model from the Construction Industry Institute (CII) and how it is applied to implement PDRI

Needs analysis & management buy-In

  • Key inputs into needs analysis including a self-audit
  • Individual Exercise – participants will complete a self-audit of their organization’s level of implementation of front end planning best practices
  • Developing a business case for implementation of PDRI

Preparing step – focus on change

  • Lessons learned on the organizational impact of PDRI
  • The essential roll of the champion
  • Identifying change preparation areas using CII’s Change Audit tool
  • Interactive exercise – using a case study, small groups will complete a Change Audit, interpret the current state of preparation, and identify change priorities.

Initiating step – PDRI Limited-use pilot

  • Lessons learned on initiating a limited-use pilot
  • Developing pilot success criteria
  • Criteria for selecting pilot projects
  • Building the communications plan
  • Selecting PDRI facilitators, providing training and pilot support
  • Best practices in preparing and communicating your success story
  • Pilot close-out steps

Growing step – expanding your PDRI implementation

  • Defining your expansion requirements for the PDRI practice
  • Process integration considerations including stage gate deliverables, cost, schedule and risk practices
  • Identifying fit-for-purpose changes to PDRI elements with the rollout to new groups or divisions
  • Managing fit-for-purpose changes to project templates using Carve
  • Developing your education plan
  • Maintaining consistency in PDRI practices using Carve
  • Measuring performance impact of PDRI and monitoring by portfolio/group/division in Carve
  • Incorporating PDRI into your lessons learned program
  • Interactive Exercise – using a case study, small groups will complete the Growing Step Evaluation to benchmark where a PDRI implementation currently stands, and identify critical tasks that still need to be addressed.

Summary

  • Revisit the Implementation planning model for PDRI
  • Review the software, tools and techniques introduced to assist in implementation planning
  • Discuss important “take-aways”
  • Conduct course evaluation

Course Instructor

Sandra MacGillivray, MBA, PMP is the Managing Director for Valency Inc., a provider of project readiness solutions that reduce risk for organizations that manage a large portfolio of capital projects. She is a Certified PDRI Facilitator, Registered Education Provider (REP) with the Construction Industry Institute (CII), and a Project Management Professional (PMP) with over 15 years of project management experience. Sandra is a past research team member with the Construction Industry Institute on front end planning, risk management and portfolio management. She holds a Bachelor of Science from the University of Waterloo and a Master in Business Administration from Wilfred Laurier University.

Certificate

A certificate of completion will be issued to those who attend and complete the course. The course is conducted by Valency, a Registered Education Provider for the Construction Industry Institute (CII). Those who complete the course will earn 8 Professional Development Hour (PDH) credits.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course participants will be able to:

  • Apply the CII Implementation planning model to their implementation of PDRI
  • Conduct a self-audit of their organization’s level of implementation of front end planning best practices
  • Prepare a business case for the adoption of PDRI
  • Conduct a change audit of how PDRI will impact their organization, and identify change priorities
  • Develop an “initiating phase” implementation plan for a limited-use pilot of PDRI
  • Develop a “growth phase” implementation plan rollout of PDRI to new groups or divisions

P959 Project Scheduling & Planning (PSP) and Scheduling Professional (PMI-SP®) Certifications

This two-day training course will provide participants with a thorough background in the concepts of Planning and Scheduling Engineering and Construction projects. The course addresses how to identify, monitor, and balance information crucial for the successful management of projects. It will discuss the development of a baseline performance management plan (PMP)® for the project that will allow the efficient compilation and the timely generation of quantitative performance comparisons. The comparisons highlight significant performance departures (“actual vs. baseline”) and allow for preventive and early remedial and corrective actions.

The course manual was prepared in line with the Project Management Institute (PMI)® A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) extended version for Engineering and Construction projects. Accordingly, in addition to the nine knowledge areas: Integration, Scope, Time, Cost, Quality, Human Resources, Communications, Risk and Procurement, course will cover Financial, Claims, Safety and Environment.

This course will provide those interested in attaining their “Planning and Scheduling Professional (PSP)” certification from The Association of Advancement of Cost Engineering (AACE-International) with an excellent review material that will increase their chances in passing this 8-hour exam. In addition, this course is an excellent introduction for attending the Project Management Professional (PMP)® Certification Preparation course that will prepare delegates for applying for the PMP® certification exam or PMI-SP® certification of the Project Management Institute (PMI)®.

The course will use Primavera for Engineering and Construction 5.0 to demonstrate how today’s available tools can be use to effectively manage projects data and provide visibility for important project performance data. It is therefore highly recommended for delegates to attend a course on managing projects using Primavera for Engineering and Construction after attending this course to gain the full competency in applying the knowledge gained on their projects.

Who Should Attend

 This course is vital for Executives with limited or no previous project management experience, Project Management Team Members, Project Coordinators, Project Control Managers and Engineers, Project Planning and Scheduling Engineers, Project Administrators, Project Expediters, Assistant Project Managers and Junior Project Managers.

Course Outline

Introduction

  • Understanding Project Definitions and Characteristics
  • Project Success and Delivery Pains
  • The Science of Project Management
  • Project Stakeholders

Develop the Baseline Plan

  • Initiating a Project
  • Decompose the Project Scope
  • Assign Responsibility
  • Schedule the Work
  • Defining Activities
  • Sequencing Activities
  • Resource Requirements
  • Duration Estimating
  • Scheduling & Schedule Compression
  • Develop Time-Phased Budget
  • Schedule Compliance with QA/QC Plan
  • Develop the Project Communication Plan
  • Develop the Risk Management Plan
  • Set the Performance Baseline Plan

Project Implementation

  • Manage the Schedule Plan
  • Manage the Project Costs
  • Analyze Project Performance Data
  • Maintain the Project Baseline

Delay Analysis

  • Owner, Engineer and Contractor Delays
  • After the Fact Delay Analysis Techniques
  • Delay Damages and Acceleration

PMBOK, PMI, PMI-SP and PMP are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

P865 Constructing the Project Management Office (PMO) for the Engineering and Construction Industry

The Constructing the Project Management Office (PMO) Course is designed for Operation Managers, Project Managers and PMO’s alike. The course covers the type of PMOs an organization can build, how to build it and how to operate the PMO.

Learning Outcome

  • How to select the PMO that best suits your needs
  • How to build the PMO
  • How to build the PMO policies and procedures
  • How to assign responsibilities for operating the PMO
  • How to build a Project Management Information System (PMIS) to support the PMO operations
  • How to have the PMO the capture project delivery knowledge

Who Should Attend

Anyone involved in Project Management who wants to sharpen his skills in managing a project portfolio. Those who want to bring added value to his organization by delivering a consistent project management message along with the right projects; on time, every time.

What Industries

Government, Real Estate Development, Aerospace, Defense, Engineering and Construction, Manufacturing and Industrial, Oil and Gas, Petrochemical, Power and Water Utility Plants, Education and Training, Retail, Financial Services, Information Technology, Telecommunication, Automotive, Media Production, E-Business Enablers, Marketing and Sales, Pharmaceuticals, Environmental Management, Hospitality Management, Shipbuilding and Repair Yards.

Course Outline

Introduction

  • The standards for managing projects, programs and portfolios
  • The Crucial Role of Projects in Achieving A Company Strategic Objectives
  • Organizational Impacts of Adapting Project Management
  • What Is The Project Management Office (PMO)?

Constructing the PMO

  • Stage 1 – Orientation and Exploring Client’s Facilities and Projects
  • Stage 2 – Data Collection
  • Stage 3 – Organization Project Management Capabilities Assessment
  • Stage 4 – Developing the PMO
    • How To Improve Problem Solving Through Project Risk, Issue and Change Management Processes
  • Stage 5 – Mapping Project Management Processes into the Project Portfolio Management (PPM) System
    • Project Control System Modules
    • How The PPM Will Be Used In Mapping All Project Management Processes
    • How Can PPM Helps To Visualize a “Single Version of the Truth” Of All Project Management Processes Across all Projects
  • Stage 6 – Implementing Project Management Training for Staff
  • Business Case for Constructing and Operating a PMO Solution for a Private Real Estate Developer

Case Studies

  • Case Study # 1: PMO Assessment for a Public Sector Entity in the MENA Region
  • Case Study # 2: Technical Audit Assignment for a Major Real Estate Developer
  • Case Study # 3: PMO at a Capital Investment Company
  • Case Study # 4: Building Information Modeling (BIM) Deliverables
  • Case Study # 5: Project Life Cycle Deliverables for a Project Management Firm
  • Case Study # 6: Managing the Client Project Gateway Review Process
  • Case Study # 7: Project Management Processes for a Public Sector Real Estate Developer
  • Case Study # 8: Project Life Cycle Project Management Processes for a Project Management Firm
  • Case Study # 9: Building the Project Portfolio Management Information System (PPMIS) for a Private Real Estate Developer
  • Case Study # 10: Automating the Risk Management Identification, Assessment and Mitigation Processes for an EPC Contractor
  • Case Study # 11: Establishing the Key Performance Indicators (KPI) for a Government Entity
  • Case Study # 12: Establishing the Key Performance Indicators (KPI) for a Real Estate Developer

P603 Project Time Management Based on PMBOK 5th Edition

Effective project management requires adequate time for planning and adequate time for implementation of those plans. Project activities are decomposed and then activities are sequenced, calculated, and accounted for. Most updated tools and techniques for estimating the time for work packages are covered in details. The course also addresses creating and visualizing the network diagram and how to develop and control the project schedule.

Time management is an essential element on the PMP exam. Some Q & As are   tackled to increase the understanding.

Time management is crucial to not only passing the PMP exam, but also to successful project management.

Course Content:

The Project Time Management course follows the framework of the Project Management Body of Knowledge PMBOK 5th Edition. The topic is introduced and discussed, with emphasis on the Inputs-Processes-Tools and Techniques-and Outputs structure outlined in the PMBOK 5th Edition.

  • An introduction to Project Management.
  • Plan Schedule Management
  • Define Activities.
  • Sequence Activities.
  • Estimate Activity Resources.
  • Estimate Activity Duration.
  • Develop Schedule.
  • Control Schedule.
  • Q&A

The course is designed for professionals seeking to build or refresh their Project Time Management knowledge based on the latest PMBOK Edition.

Who Should Attend

The PMP recognizes demonstrated competence in leading and directing project teams. If you’re an experienced project manager, a planner or scheduler who is looking to solidify your skills, stand out to employers and maximize your earning potential, the PMP credential is the right choice for you

In What Industries

Government, Real Estate Development, Aerospace, Defense, Engineering and Construction, Manufacturing and Industrial, Oil, Gas and Petrochemical, Power and Water Utility Plants, Education and Training, Retail, Financial Services, Information Technology, Telecommunication, Media Production, E-Business Enablers, Marketing and Sales, Pharmaceuticals, Environmental Management, Hospitality Management, Shipbuilding and Repair Yards.

P980 Program Management Professional (PgMP)® Certification Exam Preparation

The PgMP® credential recognizes advanced experience, skill and performance in the oversight of multiple related projects and their resources aligned with an organizational objective. PgMP® credential holders oversee the success of a program – a way to group multiple, related projects to achieve benefits that may not be realized if the projects were managed in a stand-alone fashion.

Approach

 The training approach includes:

  • Discussing topics
  • Completing a simulated exam per each topic
  • Discussing the exam solutions
  • Completing learning exercises
  • Completing an integrated exam

Course objectives

 Prepare for obtaining the PgMP® certification;

  • Implement a solid program management methodology from program initiation to project closure
  • Understand program management principles, concepts, processes, tools and techniques;
  • Learn how to adapt program management practices to specific situations;

Who Should Attend

As project managers advance in their careers, the experience they gain in managing multiple, related projects and making decisions that advance strategic and business objectives demonstrates this competence. As employers demand program managers who can support the strategic objectives of the organization, PgMP® credential holders will gain a distinct advantage in employment and promotional opportunities over their peers.

 In What Industries

Government, Real Estate Development, Aerospace, Defense, Engineering and Construction, Manufacturing and Industrial, Oil and Gas, Petrochemical, Power and Water Utility Plants, Education and Training, Retail, Financial Services, Information Technology, Telecommunication, Automotive, Media Production, E-Business Enablers, Marketing and Sales, Pharmaceuticals, Environmental Management, Hospitality Management, Shipbuilding and Repair Yards.

Course Outline

 

Day One

Module 1 – About

  • Course content and agenda
  • About the course materials
  • About the certification
  • About the exam

Module 2 –Framework

  • Projects, programs and portfolios;
  • Understanding project and program success;
  • Constraints
  • Program life cycle, project life cycles and product life cycles;
  • Program and project management knowledge areas;
  • Functional, matrix and projectized organizations;
  • PMO;
  • OPM3
  • Stakeholders and their roles;
  • Performance domains

Module 3 – Program strategy alignment

  • Organizational strategy and program alignment
  • Program roadmap
  • Environmental assessment

Module 4 – Benefit management

  • Identification
  • Analysis and planning
  • Delivery
  • Transition
  • Sustainment

Day two

Module 4 – Stakeholder management

  • Stakeholder identification
  • Engagement planning
  • Engagement

Module 5 – Program governance

  • Governance boards and responsibilities
  • Typical roles
  • Governing bodies
  • Supporting activities

Module 6 – Life cycle management

  • Program definition
  • Program benefits delivery
  • Program closure

Day three

Module 7 – Communications management

  • Communications planning;
  • Information distribution;
  • Performance reporting;

Module 8 – Financial management

  • Cost estimation;
  • Financial framework establishment
  • Financial management plan
  • Component cost estimation
  • Cost budgeting
  • Financial monitoring and controlling
  • Financial closure

Module 9 – Integration management

  • Initiation
  • Program management plan
  • Infrastructure development
  • Delivery management
  • Performance monitoring and controlling
  • Transition and benefit sustainment
  • Closure

Day Four

Module 10 – Procurement management

  • Procurement planning
  • Procurement
  • Procurement administration
  • Procurement closure

Module 11 – Quality management

  • Quality planning
  • Quality assurance
  • Quality control

Module 12 – Resource management

  • Resource planning
  • Resource prioritization
  • Resource interdependency management

Day Five

Module 13 – Risk management

  • Risk management planning;
  • Risk identification;
  • Risk analysis;
  • Risk response planning;
  • Risk monitoring and controlling;

Module 14 – Scope management

  • Scope planning;
  • Scope control;

Module 15 – Schedule management

  • Schedule planning;
  • Schedule control;

Module 16 – Exam simulation

  • Exam simulation;
  • Exam analysis and diagnosis;

Certificate

A certificate of completion will be issued to those who attend and complete the program. This Course will entitle delegates to 21 Professional Development Units (PDU’s) required for the PgMP® Exam.

PgMP is a registered mark of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

P604 Project Cost Management Based on PMBOK 5th Edition

Project Cost Management includes the processes involved in planning, estimating, budgeting, financing, funding, managing and controlling costs so the project can be completed within approved budget

Course Content:

The Project Cost Management course follows the framework of the Project Management Body of Knowledge PMBOK 5th Edition. The topic is introduced and discussed, with emphasis on the Inputs-Processes-Tools and Techniques-and Outputs structure outlined in the PMBOK 5th Edition.

  • An introduction to Project Management.
  • Plan Cost Management
  • Estimate Cost.
  • Determine Budget.
  • Control Costs.
  • Q&A

The course is designed for professionals seeking to build or refresh their Project Cost Management knowledge based on the latest PMBOK Edition.

Who Should Attend

The PMP recognizes demonstrated competence in leading and directing project teams. If you’re an experienced project manager, a planner or scheduler who is looking to solidify your skills, stand out to employers and maximize your earning potential, the PMP credential is the right choice for you

In What Industries

Government, Real Estate Development, Aerospace, Defense, Engineering and Construction, Manufacturing and Industrial, Oil, Gas and Petrochemical, Power and Water Utility Plants, Education and Training, Retail, Financial Services, Information Technology, Telecommunication, Media Production, E-Business Enablers, Marketing and Sales, Pharmaceuticals, Environmental Management, Hospitality Management, Shipbuilding and Repair Yards.